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Full text of "Echo"

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1944 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/echo1944smit 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 

Issued by the Students of Smith Academy 
Hatfield, Massachusetts 

Vol. IV June, 1944 

CONTENTS 

Dedication 3 

Senior Pictures 4-8 

Class History 9 

Seniorscope 10 

Cheerleaders 11 

Class Day Program 12-19 

They'll Never Forget 13 

Faculty Picture 20 

Student Council 21 

School Paper Staff 22 

Junior Class Picture 23 

Sophomore Class Picture 24 

Freshman Class Picture 25 

Honor Essays .-. 26-28 

Boys' Basketball Team 29 

Soccer Team 30 

Baseball Team 31 

Girls' Basketball Team 32 

School News 33 

Dramatic Club and Senior Play Cast <.. 35 

Year Book Staff 36 

Pro Merito 37 

Future Farmers of America 40 

Literary 41 

Informal Snapshots 42 

Autographs 44 

Advertisements 45 




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$20,000. 




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sat 

lire bureau 
l-News 
ft, Box 373 
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[news of interest to the 
written 




Dedication 



In grateful appreciation, the class of 1944 dedicates this volume to 
the alumni of Smith Academy who are now serving the cause of Democ- 
racy on the land, in the air, and on the sea. Proudly we salute them and 
pay tribute to their loyalty and patriotism in this Roll of Honor. 



Adamcik, Peter 
Barnard, Orlo 
Belden, Arthur 
Belden, James 
Belden, Richard 
Bieber, Robert 
Blyda, John 
Blyda, William 
Bokina, Carl 
Bokina, Helen 
Bokina, Henry 
Breor, Elizabeth 
Breor, Paul 
Ciszewski, Alexander 
Day, James 
Deinlein, Leonard 
Dickinson, Paul 
Donelson, George 
Donnis, Edward 
Donnis, Henry 
Dzwil, Zygmount 
Filipek, Joseph 
Fitzgerald, Arthur 
Fii;zgerald, Robert 
Gocloski, Charles 
Godin, Bernard 
Godin, Edward 
Godin, James 
Graves, Alfred 
Hayes, William 



Jackowski, Alphonse 
Jandzinski, John 
Jandzinski, Mary 
Jaworski, Felix 
Jubenville, Alfred 
Kingsley, Edward 
Kirejczyk, Stanley 
Kochan, John 
Kochan, John 
Kochan, Joseph 
Krawczyk, Frank 
Krawczyk, Joseph 
Krawczyk, Walter 
Kuckucka, John 
Lovett, Edward 
Maciorowski, Stanley 
Maksimoski, Edward 
Maksimoski, Joseph 
Marcinowski, Bernard 
Marcinowski, Michael 
Maslanka, Egnot 
McGrath, Robert 
Mieckowski, Michael 
Mullany, Robert 
Mullins, John 
Mullins, Thomas 
O'Dea, Charles 
Olszewski, William 
Omasta, Suzanne 
Osciak, Frank 



Osciak, William 
Osley, Christine 
Osley, Donald 
Osley, Samuel 
Podmayer, John 
Proulx, Eugene 
Proulx, John 
Prucnal, Anthony 
Prucnal, Stanley 
Remiszewski, Stanley 
Saydlowski, Robert 
Schepp, Laura 
Serowick, Henry 
Skorupski, Andrew 
Skorupski, Chester 
Slattery, Donald 
Solak, John 
Vachula, Stephen 
Walsh, James 
Wendolowski, Louis 
Wesolowski, Anthony 
Wesolowski, Walter 
Yarrows, Anthony 
Zehelski, Alfred 
Zehelski, Frederick 
Zehelski, Joseph 
Zima, Samuel 
Zgrodnik, Charles 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 




EDWARD PASZEK "Oscar" 

Hatfield, General: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 

3, 4. Class President 4. Assistant Business Manager Year- 
book 3. Business Manager Yearbook 4. Assistant Business 
Manager School Paper 3. Business Manager School Paper 

4. Manager Soccer 4. Assistant Manager Basketball 4. 
Prize Speaking 3. Senior Play 4. Dramatic Club 4. New 
York Trip 4. 

Always with the girls . . . interested in school 
affairs . . . ideal manager . . . tall and lanky . . . always 
late!!! (10 o'clock scholar). 



EDWARD MALINOWSKI "Muller" 

North Hatfield, Agriculture: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 
3, 4. Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4. Class President 2, 3. Class Vice- 
President 4. Student Council 3, 4. President Student 
Council 4. Prize Speaking 3. Future Farmers of America 
1, 2, 3. 

Joke teller . . . never in a hurry . . . likes sports . . . 
well liked ... he and studies just don't mix. 



IRENE ZELEWICZ "Foxie" 

Hatfield, Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 

1, 2, 3, 4. Student Council 4. School Paper 1, 2, 3, 4. As- 
sociate Editor School Paper 4. Feature Editor Yearbook 
4. Cheer Leader 3, 4. Personality Club 3. Basketball 1, 

2, 3. Prize Speaking 3. Senior Play 4. Dramatic Club 4. 
Class Secretary 4. 

Knows what A"s are . . . full of fun . . . nice to 
know . . . pretty smile . . . loves dancing . . . keeps up 
the Navy morale . . . salutatorian. 




EDITH FILIPEK "Ede" 

Hatfield, Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 
2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3. Prize Speaking 3. Class Treas- 
urer 3, 4. School Paper 3, 4. Yearbook 4. Dramatic Club 
4. Senior Play 4. Camera Club 4. New York Trip 4. 

Tall . . . fun lover . . . popular . . . romantic . . . 
always talking about the Air Corps ? ? ? 



SMITH ACADEMY 



HENRY BETSOLD "Hiney" 

Hatfield, General: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 
3, 4. Class Vice-President 1. Prize Speaking 3. Soc:er 4. 
Baseball 4. Dramatic Club 4. Senior Play 4. 

Short . . . Rita ???... plays the accordion . . . 
blushes . . . great speaker. 



LAURA BIELECKI "Shorty" 

Bradstreet, General: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 

2, 3, 4. Basketball 1. Camera Club 3. New York Trip 4. 

Dramatic Club 4. Senior Play 4. 

Short . . . her and her laugh . . . Redman ? ? ? 

friendly . . . Walter??? 



SOPHY CACKOWSKI "Zosh" 

Bradstreet, General: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 

2, 3, 4. Camera Club 3. Feature Editor Yearbook 4. School 

Paper 4. New York Trip 4. 

Dimples . . . dark hair . . . White Eagle . . . heart 

interest in Sunderland ? ? ? ... pleasant smile. 




CHARLES DRAKE "Pop" 

Amherst, General: Glee Club 3, 4. Chorus 3, 4. Senior 

Play 4. Dramatic Club 4. Baseball 4. 

Lover of gum . . . girls don't bother him (who 

are we kidding ? ) . . . good natured . . . "To be or 

not to be!" . . . definitely a Republican. 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 





HELEN KOCHAN "Heddy" 

Hatfield, Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 

2, 3, 4. Charm and Etiquette Club 3. New York Trip 4. 
Air Corps . . . easily disturbed . . . visits school 

once in a while . . . easy going . . . silent type (oh yeah!) 



MARY MAJESKI "Mary" 

Hatfield, General: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 
3, 4. School Paper 2, 4. Literary Editor School Paper 3. 
Literary Editor Yearbook 3, 4. Student Council 3. Treas- 
urer Student Council 4. Pro Merito 3. President Pro 
Merito 4. Basketball 1, 2. Manager Girls' Basketball 3, 4. 
Personality Club 3. Senior Play 4. Dramatic Club 4. New 
York Trip 4. 

Tops in studies . . . our valedictorian . . . favorite 
spot Chem. Lab??? swell girl . . . always willing to help. 





VERA MIELESKO "Mousey" 

Hatfield, Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 
1, 2, 3, 4. Camera Club 3. School Paper 3, 4. Basketball 
1. New York Trip 4. 

Explosive giggle . . . doesn't know what studying 
is . . . decision between history or the teacher . . . short 
. . . Saturday nights. 



JANET MOSKOWICZ "Jan" 

Hatfield, Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 
2, 3, 4. Charm and Etiquette Club 3. New York Trip 4. 

Neat and well dressed . . . quiet??? tiny . . . good- 
natured . . . always on the defensive. 



SMITH ACADEMY 




SOPHIE PINKOWSKI "Blondie" 

Hatfield, General: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 

3, 4. Basketball 1. Camera Club 3. Class Treasurer 2. 

Class Vice-President 3. New York Trip 4. 

Tall and blonde . . . sense of humor . . . speaking 

of morale 111 ... always bringing up the rear . . . 

swell kid . . . Saturday nights. 



HELEN SEROWICK "Bubbles" 

Bradstreet, General: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 

1, 2, 3, 4. School Paper 3. Editor-in-Chief School Paper 4. 

Editor-in-Chief Yearbook 4. Personality Club 3. Dramatic 

Club 4. Senior Play 4. 

Blushes easily ? ? ? ... short dresses . . . wide interest 

in school affairs ... a typing genius . . . great dancer. 



VERNA SKORUPSKI "Viv" 

Hatfield, Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 

1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3. Cheer Leader 3, 4. Prize 

Speaking 3. Secretary Student Council 4. School Paper 

1, 2, 3. Associate Editor School Paper 4. 

"Joe" . . . Florida . . . talkative . . . always late 

. . . loves Army furloughs . . . romantically inclined . . . 

third honors. 




CLARA TOCZYDLOWSKI "Coggy" 

Hatfield, Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 
1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 4. Personality Club 3. New 
York Trip 4. 

Swell girl . . . subject to laughing spells . . . for- 
ever arguing . . . visits Bob's quite often . . . always 
eating. 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 




ALBERT VACHULA "Moose" 

North Hatfield, General: Glee Club 1, 2, 4. Chorus 

1, 2, 4. Basketball 2, 4. Baseball 1, 2, 4. Soccer 1, 2, 4. 

Class Vice-President 2. School Paper 2. Sport Editor 

School Paper 4. Sport Editor Yearbook 4. New York Trip 

4. Future Farmers of America 2. 

Fishing- instead of school ???... heart interest in 

South Deerfield . . . girls don't bother him (MUCH) . . . 

New York Trip. 



EDWARD ZIMA "Butch" 

Hatfield. General: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 
2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. Soccer 2, 3, 4. Base- 
ball 2. New York Trip 4. Class President 1. Prize Speak- 
ing 4. Captain Basketball 3, 4. Assistant Business Man- 
ager School Paper 4. Assistant Business Manager Year- 
book 4. 

Whiz on the basketball floor . . . favorite subject 
snrls!!! . . . tall and blonde . . . forever writing. 



Ex-Seniors 



PAUL VACHULA 
FRANCES SADOSKI 
CHARLOTTE LEZYNSKI 
ALEX KOCIELA 
JEANETTE ZAPKA 
JOSEPH PINKO SKI 
JOSEPH CELATKA 
ALFRED PROULX 
RUTH OMASTA 



EDWARD SKORUPSKI 
RUDOLPH WOLOSS 
MARION MULLINS 
ELIZABETH LaMONTAGNE 
MILDRED LAPINSKI 
ROBERT JANDZINSKI 
HELEN WESOLOWSKI 
EDWARD MICHALOWSKI 
FREDERICK ROTH 



SMLTH ACADEMY 



Class History 



In September of 1940, we entered Smith 
Academy thirty-nine ambitious students. As 
our first class officers we elected Edward 
Zima, president; Henry Betsold, vice-presi- 
dent; Marion Mullins, secretary; Cory Bard- 
well, treasurer. Miss Lyons and Mr. Carroll 
were our first class advisors. We were feted 
with a freshman reception given by the 
class of '42. There we all had a grand time, 
and Marion Mullins and Edward Malinow- 
ski captured first prize for the best per- 
formance. In December we entertained the 
other classes at our Christmas Party. 

In 1941, we began our sophomore year 
with only twenty-two students. We elected 
Edward Malinowski, president; Albert Vach- 
ula, vice-president; Sophie Pinkoski, treas- 
urer; and Mary Hafey, secretary. Miss Al- 
laire and Mr. Larkin were our class advis- 
ors. It was in this second round that we 
entered the other classes at a Hallowe'en 
Party. This second year was a happy one 
for most of us. 

Our third year in Smith Academy found 
us with only seventeen members. Our class 
officers in that year were Edward Malinow- 
ski, president; Sophie Pinkoski, vice-presi- 
dent; Irene Zelewicz, secretary; Edith Fili- 
pek, treasurer. Our class advisors were Mrs. 
O'Neill and Mr. Jakobek. In October, we 
honored the Freshmen at the Freshman 
Reception. In December, Cory Bardwell and 
Mary Majeski became members of the Pro 



Merito Society. Members of our class tak- 
ing part in the Alumni Prize-Speaking Con- 
test in 1943 were Edward Malinowski, Helen 
Kochan, Edward Paszek, Irene Zelewicz, 
Mary Majeski, Edith Filipek, Henry Betsold 
and Verna Skorupski, with Sophy Cackowski 
and Charles Drake as alternates. First prize 
for the girls went to Irene Zelewicz and 
second prize to Verna Skorupski, while sec- 
ond prize for the boys went to Henry Bet- 
sold. 

In our senior year we had a roll call of 
eighteen members, for Albert Vachula had 
come back to S. A. from Smith's School. Our 
class officers for this year were Edward 
Paszek, president; Edward Malinowski, 
vice-president; Irene Zelewicz, secretary; 
and Edith Filipek, treasurer. For this final 
year our class advisors were Miss Ryan 
and Miss Stoddard. In January, we produced 
a play entitled "Huckleberry Finn," the 
proceeds of which went into the fund for 
the New York trip. In May, the honor stu- 
dents were announced as Mary Majeski, 
valedictorian; Irene Zelewicz, salutatorian; 
Verna Skorupski, third honor student. These 
three students spoke at the graduation ex- 
ercises. 

Our journey ended happily on June lo ( 
1944 with wishes for the best of luck to 
future classes. 

MARY MAJESKI '44 
VERNA SKORUPSKI '44 




10 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



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SMITH ACADEMY 



11 



Cheer Leaders 




Irene Zelewicz, Jean Bryant, Verna Skorupski 



* * * 



CLASS FLOWER 
Yellow Rose 



CLASS COLORS 
Blue and Gold 






CLASS MOTTO 

"On the Youth of Today, Rests the Democracy of tomorrow. 



12 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



CLASS DAY PROGRAM 



Address of Welcome 



It is my privilege to welcome you here 
tonight and to extend to you sincere thanks 
in behalf of my class for your help in mak- 
ing this occasion a memorable one. I want 
to extend thanks to our friends, teachers, 
classmates and parents for their constant 
help and encouragement during the past 
four years. If it had not been for their far- 
seeing vision we might easily have lost sight 
of the goal towards which we were pro- 
gressing. Now that we have reached that 



goal, we realize for the first time the debt 
of gratitude we owe to all those who have 
made its achievement possible. 

Our graduation exercises tomorrow will 
mark Smith Academy's sixty-ninth com- 
mencement, and tonight's informal program 
will review our four years at this school. 
So once again, in behalf of my class, I give 
you all a cordial welcome. 

EDWARD PASZEK '44 



Class Gifts 



Edward Zima — To Butch, who has been so 
busy as to be forgetful at certain times, 
we give this date book, in the hope, that it 
will help him a little; at least to remem- 
ber their names. We hope he won't get 
all his girl friends mixed up in the Ma- 
rines, as he did when he was in high 
school. 

Helen Kochan — Helen has been pretty blue 
since her soldier boy has been transferred 
from Amherst. Because he can't come 
over in one of his airplanes, we decided 
to buy Helen an airplane of her own. It's 
not quite as big as the ones he flies, but 
— this one doesn't need any gas. 

Vera Mielesko — Vera seems to think that 
soldiers are better than any other service- 
man. When Vera begins to write those 
long letters they all seem to go the Army 
way. So for Vera we have some station- 
ery. But this stationery has a Marine in- 
signia on it, so please, Vera, don't send 
it to the Army. Why not try telling it to 
the Marines? 

Mary Majeski — Mary has been doing her 
best to keep her figure slim lately. We 
wonder, if it's for that certain someone? 
Well, to help her keep it that way we 
decided to buy her a jump rope. But we 
couldn't find one anywhere, so we had to 
get these: a pair of shoestrings. They do 
look a little like a jump rope, don't they? 
We bought them extra large, so if they're 



still too short, you'll have to tie them to- 
gether. 

Sophy Cackowski — Sophy has been having 
as a constant visitor, a 'Chevy Pickup' 
from Sunderland. But just lately, it seems 
as though the gas shortage is affecting 
him. So we bought Sophy this little pickup 
of her own. Now Sophy can ride out to 
see him half way — or maybe even all the 
way, because this 'Pickup' doesn't need 
any gas. 

Verna Skorupski — To Verna we give this 
Morse Code in the hope that, after Verna 
learns it, she will send it to that soldier 
of hers in Florida, who is forever send- 
ing those secret messages on the back of 
her letters. Then maybe We could under- 
stand them, too. 

Edward Paszek — To Edward we give this 
paper doll that he can call his own so 
that Eddie can stay home nights and give 
the rest of the girls a chance to get 
caught up on homework. 

Irene Zelewicz — For Irene we bought this 
tube of genuine non-smudge kissproof 
lipstick. The next time she enters a public 
place after doing a little parking, the 
Navy man won't be so embarrassed. 

Henry Betsold — To Henry we give this True 
Romance magazine. Through reading it 
we hope Henry can get a few ideas, as he 
is much too bashful, according to the 
girls. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



13 



Janet Moskowicz — For Janet we bought this 
address book and put all her classmates 
addresses in it. When Janet takes her 
position with the FBI in Washington, she 
won't have any excuses for not dropping 
us a line once in a while. 

Helen Serowick — To Helen, one of our book- 
keeping geniuses, we bought this bottle 
of ink, so if she goes further to school 
and takes an advanced course in Book- 
keeping, she won't have to be always 
borrowing someone else's. 

Charles Drake — This summer Charles will 
be at the top of his profession; that is, at 
the top of the telegraph poles, fixing 
wires. He ought to have an electric plant 
of his own, and we would like to set him 
up in business, but this is the best that 
can be done for him. Plant this seed in 
good soil, and in a few months you will 
have some electric plants of your own; at 
least plants that will produce more shocks to 
the acre than any electric plant on earth. 

Albert Vachula — We have for Albert this 
beautiful piece of ribbon .We thought it 
would be nice if Albert began returning 
to a few of his former girl friends the 
ribbons he has taken from them during 
his short stay at Smith Academy. 

Clara Toczydlowski — For Clara we have a 
little bottle of poison ivy medicine. This 
is to remind her to look before she rubs 



poison ivy on herself to prove that her 
beloved Smith has none growing along its 
walls. 

Edward Malinowski — Since rings for 12c 
are rather difficult to purchase nowadays, 
we decided to get Eddie a nice spool of 
white thread as a reminder of what he is 
going to get for his girl in years to come. 
Since we are naturally generous, we are 
providing thread for both of them, so 
that neither of them will forget. 

Sophie Pinkoski — This little box of matches 
will just suit its purpose for Sophie, be- 
because every time she takes driving 
lessons, she knocks down a few telephone 
poles and these will be wonderful sub- 
stitutes to replace them. 

Edith Filipek— For Edith I have a little box 
of mascara. This sweet looking girl is 
known both far and wide for her beauti- 
ful brown eyes. With this new enchant' 
ment for your eyes, we hope you can cap- 
ture that Army flier who belongs to the 
silver wings you wear. 

Laura Bielecki — For Laura we have this 
Phillies cigar. Every time Laura goes to 
a wedding she helps herself to a few, 
and says they are for her father. Laura, 
how you talk! 

EDITH FILIPEK '44 

SOPHIE PINKOSKI '44 

VERA MIELESKO '44 



They'll Never Forget 

HENRY BETSOLD .... Co-starring with Rita in the senior play 

LAURA BIELECKI Those moonlight nights 

SOPHY CACKOWSKI The Polish dances 

SOPHIE PINKOSKI Saturday nights 

VERA MIELESKO What she heard in U. S. History 

EDITH FILIPEK Her blond classmates 

VERNA SKORUPSKI Her trip to Florida 

EDWARD PASZEK Making speeches 

EDWARD ZIMA Scarlet Fever and Prize Speaking 

EDWARD MALINOWSKI His frequent visits to school 

HELEN KOCHAN Letters from the Air Corps 

JANET MOSKOWICZ Her orals in English 

CHARLES DRAKE ... His flashy shirts 

ALBERT VACHULA Those many telephone calls 

IRENE ZELEWICZ The Letters from the Navy 

MARY MAJESKI Endless hours of study 

HELEN SEROWICK School Paper Conventions 

CLARA TOCZYDLOWSKI New York Trip 



14 PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Class Statistics 



Charles Drake, the Romeo of our class, 

In the senior play, he caught the fancy of many a lass, 

On the baseball field he is 0. K. 

In Aeronautics class he shines as bright as day. 

Helen Serowick has been a clever school paper editor. 
For the honor students she has been a close competitor. 
In typing she has accuracy and speed, 
And in bookkeeping she also takes the lead. 

Vera Mielesko, who is always gay, 

Should not be teased so much by J. 

For school each morning she was usually late, 

In the D. R. Room faithfully she kept her date. 

Helen Kochan, the model of our class, 

Sets aside her homework until for the last 

She has always wanted to be a star 

But for walking, Hollywood is a little too far. 

Janet Moskowicz, our quiet little girl, 
On our trip to New York was always in a whirl. 
She's musical, for the piano she likes to play, 
And she leaves her studying for some other day. 

Verna Skorupski a stenographer would like to be 

As secretary of Student Council much practice had she, 

As a cheer leader of S. A. she did well, 

The smile of this third honor student everyone can tell. 

Edward Zima, a blond handsome lad, so tall, 
Played soccer and was Captain for basketball. 
Known in U. S. class for his debates, 
He is a guy with quite a few dates. 

Edward Malinowski, better known as Mai, 

Is quite a friend of a junior gal. 

In all sports he is a whiz 

And in "Aggie" he has never flunked a quiz. 

In Bookkeeping she does very well, 

And her giggle from afar one can tell. 

As a guard on the basketball team 

Clara Toczydlowski was certainly on the beam. 



SMITH ACADEMY 15 

Edith Filipek, neat and rather tall, 
Didn't want to come back from New York at all. 
As our class treasurer she always did well, 
And at White Eagle dances is quite a belle. 

This dark-haired girl — Laura Bielecki 

A cowgirl would like to be 

She is small and full of fun 

And her guitar music pleases everyone. 

Sophy Cackowski, our small quiet classmate, 
To English class is almost always late. 
When she smiles she sure is sweet, 
And her dancing is hard to beat. 

Here comes the class president with his stunning good looks, 
The business manager of the school papers and the yearbook. 
He manages athletics, and as "King" in the play, 
Ed Paszek's famous line was, "Put that night gown away." 

Irene Zelewicz, the class Salutatorian, is a cheer leader by trade, 

Also on the basketball team a snappy guard she made. 

In the senior play she did excel 

As Mary Jane, a charming Southern Belle. 

Albert Vachula played sports 1, 2, and 4, - 

On the basketball team he had a regular score, 

And on the baseball team a catcher was he, 

And as soccer captain he lead his team to victory. 

Mary Majeski, the manager of the girls' basketball team, 

Is the valedictorian of our class. 

In the play, she was right on the beam 

"Matilda" and "Tom" made a very good team. 

Sophie Pinkoski, the blond of our class, 

As a pastime she leads the babies across the grass. 

With Vera Mielesko you always see her, 

And the S. A. boys like to tease her. 

Henry Betsold, the prize speaker of our class, 
Is a whiz at the score board, everyone can tell 
For four years not a home game did he miss 
In the senior play he did extremely well. 

CLARA TOCZYDLOWSKI '44 
CHARLES DRAKE '44 
ALBERT VACHULA '44 



16 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Class Prophecy 



CHIEF: Henry Betsold 



REPORTERS: Helen Kochan, Janet Moskowicz 



Helen and Janet: Hello, Chief. 

Henry: Well, did you cover that story in 
Hatfield, Massachusetts: The disappearance 
of many Smith Academy graduates of 1944 
has been a mystery to the public. 

Janet: The first thing this morning, I 
interviewed the parents of Mary Majeski. 
Mary is now living in Hollywood, California, 
and is a stenographer to Errol Flynn. With 
all Flynn's publicity, hot on the daily news, 
he couldn't ask for a more competent 
stenographer to keep track of his records 
than Miss Majeski. 

I had no trouble in finding out Clara 
Toczydlowski's location. Clara is an Army 
Nurse serving in the South Pacific. Major 
Edward Zima, who met her there, is home 
on furlough. He spoke highly of the sooth- 
ing effect she has on many homesick sol- 
diers. Clara Toczydlowski is doing a wonder- 
ful job. 

I did have some difficulty in finding out 
the whereabouts of Edith Filipek, now 
that she's under another name. Living in 
Dogpatch County, Kentucky, she is the 
happy wife of Mr. Henry Peter Betsold. 
Now, with Henry Jr., Peter, Frank, Edith 
and Suzie, oops! The former Miss Filipek 
has lost track of time. 

I didn't have to look very hard for 
Charles Drake. Walking along Fifth Ave- 
nue here in New York City, I glanced up to 
see a great big sign advertising, "Drake's 
Cakes, Big and Small." Inside, I couldn't 
miss seeing a jolly young man mixing cake 
batter. 

"How's business, Charles?" I asked. 

The successful Charles Drake replied 
with a smile, "Couldn't be better; have a 
Drake's cake." 

Vera Mielesko's name was found acci- 
dently in the advertising column. It read 
as follows: "If you want a home done right, 
come to Vera's Interior Decorating Shop, 
at 2 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. Ex- 
cellent service — no waiting, Vera Mielesko, 
Proprietor." 

Driving through Texas, I honked my horn 
at a cowgirl who was taking up plenty of 



the road while singing a melody and 
strumming a guitar. To my surprise, it was 
Laura Bielecki. Laura is the proud owner 
of a cattle ranch with fifty dashing cow- 
hands to help her. 

Helen: Sophy Cackowski is well situated 
as a secretary to the president of the Mc- 
Gurgle, McGurgle and McGurgle Co. For 
this handsome man, Miss Cackowski has 
proved to be an efficient overtime worker. 

Upon entering the Holy Trinity Church 
in Hatfield, I was delighted to notice that 
a wedding was going to take place. After 
the familiar tune of "Here Comes the 
Bride," I cast my eyes on two known 
faces. The marriage vows were beginning: 

"Do you, Edward Malinowski, take Anna 
to be thy lawful wedded wife?" These words 
were being spoken by another whose face 
was familiar — Reverend Edward Paszek. 

Men were flocking to Arthur Murray 
Dancing School in New York. My curiosity 
was so great that I walked inside to find 
a most luscious blonde, Sophie Pinkoski, 
saying to one of her pupils, a teacher of 
History in '44, "One, two, glide, one, cwo, 
glide." 

With Miss Pinkcski as instructor, every- 
one is having an enjoyable time learning to 
dance. 

A trip to Washington, D. C, brought me 
in contact with Helen Serowick. now a 
typist for President Roosevelt, After re- 
ceiving a 70 and 80-word pin in S. A. she 
is doing 90 words a minute on her new 
job. Miss Serowick's career is in the best 
of hands. 

Entering the Valley Arena, I was all set 
to see the great magician, "Okas Pokas," 
who was none other than Albert Vachula 
saying, "Now you see it and now you 
don't." 

Next came a rabbit out of his hat, after 
the mysterious words, "Abraka Dabraka." 
Then this fantastic turbaned creature left 
the amazed audience. Up went the sign, 
"50c if you want to see more." Mr. Vachula 
doesn't have to work very hard for a 
living, does he?!! 



SMITH ACADEMY 



17 



I found Irene Zelewicz working for Frank 
Sinatra. Taking care of his business seems 
to be a side line with her. Sitting on his 
knees and listening to his enchanting voice 
is hardly the job of a private secretary. 
Personally, Miss Zelewicz doesn't have any 
objections. 

Verna Skorupski can be found at any 
time working as a saleswoman in Fibsey 
Wibsey's bargain basement. As I was ap- 
proaching her counter, I overheard Verna 
saying to a Mr. Five by Five, "Size 54? 
Why I think size 24 would fit you perfectly." 

Whatever happened to Miss Skorupski's 
business career cannot be explained. 

Henry: "Well, does that take care of all 
the graduates in the class of '44?" 

Janet: "Chief, I couldn't find the where- 
abouts of Helen Kochan." 

Helen: "There is one I couldn't find either. 
Her name is Janet Moskowicz." 

Henry: "Well, it's just lucky that I 
happen to know the whereabouts of those 



two girls. If I recall, they're both married, 
but I quite can't recall how many children 
each has. 1 recall when I was in high 
school how they always stuck together and 
they're the same now. They have a two 
apartment house — one family upstairs and 
one family downstairs. By the way, I hear 
there is quite a little noise when all their 
youngsters gets started. Boy, I pitv their 
husbands!" 

Janet: What are their married names, 
and what do their husbands do? 

Henry: One name is Mr. and Mrs. Ishka 
Bible. Her maiden name was Janet Mos- 
kowicz. Do you know her, Janet? 

Janet: No. 

Henry: You lucky kid. The other couple's 
name, I think, is Mr. and Mrs. Raski 
Waski. They live on the bottom floor. They 
get all the racket from the upstairs. The 
girl's maiden name was Miss Helen Kochan. 
Well, that's all for today, I guess. So till 
we get another hot story, I'll be saying, 
goodbye. 



Class Will 



We, the Class of 1944 of Smith Academy, 
being about to leave this sphere, in full 
possession of a sound mind, memory and 
understanding, do hereby make and publish 
this, our last will and testament, hereby 
revoking and making void all former wills 
by us at any time heretofore made. 

To MR. LARKIN . . . our worthy prin- 
cipal, we leave the memory of the many 
harrowing problems that we as a class pre- 
sented him. We also leave the extreme 
pleasure of getting rid of us. 

To MISS CONNELLY ... we leave a 
stapler, a supply of ink, scotch tape, glue, 
and a puncher, so that the H. A. girls won't 
have to wear out their precious shoe cou- 
pons going away up to the third floor, 
into the office to get them. 

To MISS RYAN ... we leave the me- 
mory of the almost fatal mistake she made 
the night of the senior play. (Remember, 
Miss Ryan, the butcher knife — not the ham- 
mer?) 

To MR. BART ... we leave a beautiful 
photograph of the class of 1944, in order 
that he may familiarize himself with us, 



since we are leaving so soon after his ar- 
rival, and two tire certificates which we 
obtained from the rationing board, after 
much hard work, to be used for the sole 
purpose of driving the aggie boys back and 
forth from Luther Belden's farm. 

To MRS. MULLER . . . whose musical 
talent has pleased us greatly, we leave all 
the music books in order that she may help 
the students obtain such a beautiful voice as 
the one she possesses. 

To MR. JAKOBEK ... we leave a new 
hat, to distinguish him from the players. 
We also leave him a long list of words to 
be used for arguing with the umpire. 

To MR. BRISTOL ... we leave a new 
desk complete with telephone, typewriter, 
adding machine and all the paper needed to 
keep the Hatfield schools going. P. S. Also 
a wastepaper basket. 

To MRS. O'NEILL ... we leave an eleva- 
tor to eliminate the necessity of having to 
walk up and down the stairs to her classes. 

To MISS STODDARD ... we leave a 
supply of new records for the typing room 
victrola. We know she must be weary of 
listening to the old tunes. 



18 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



LAURA BIELECKI . . . leaves to Victoria 
Zawacki, all the charm for attracting that 
certain Freshman boy as Laura used to. 

MARY MAJESKI . . . leaves all the hard 
work of being Manager of the Girls' Bas- 
ketball team to Evelyn Vachula, who shows 
signs of managing ways. 

EDWARD PASZEK . . . leaves to Betty 
Wilkes his erratic, far from dependable 
alarm clock, in order that Betty may get 
to school on time as many times as Edward 
has during the last year. 

HELEN SEROWICK . . . leaves to Rita 
Godin all her sleepless nights spent worry- 
ing about the school papers and yearbook. 
May Rita survive as well as Helen did. 

SOPHY CACKOWSKI ... who likes to 
"trip the light fantastic,' leaves to Gladys 
Maciorowski those pleasant memories of the 
White Eagle and Red men dances. We hope 
that Blondie enjoys herself in future years 
as much as Sophy has in the past. 

IRENE ZELEWICZ . . . leaves to Paulina 
Widelo her typing technique and her large 
correspondence with service boys, especially 
sailors. Will you carry on for Irene, Paul- 
ine? 

CHARLES DRAKE . . . leaves to Velma 
Omasta his abundant supply of gum, so that 
Velma will have enough gum to chew at 
all times. 

HENRY BETSOLD . . . leaves his musi- 
cal talent to Jean Bryant, so that Jean 
can add it to her already large supply of 
musical ability. 

VERNA SKORUPSKI . . . whose coiffure 
has been the envy of many, leaves her fea- 
ther-cut hair - do to Margaret Wentzel, so 
that Peggy won't have to go through all 
that trouble of braiding her hair every day. 

CLARA TOCZYDLOWSKI . . . leaves to 
Anna Zima her giggles and her chuckles, ac- 
companied by her uproarious laugh. 

EDITH FILIPEK . . . with generous good 
will, leaves her flirtations in the care of 
Carolyn Kosior, who will, we hope, carry 
on as well as Edith did. 

JANET MOSKOWICZ . . . leaves her 
beaming smile, which has charmed many a 
lad, to William Wendolowski, who will be 
glad, we know, to add it to his charm kit. 

HELEN KOCHAN . . . leaves all her 



unfinished homework to Robert Pelc. That 
studious lad will see that it is completed. 

ALBERT VACHULA . . . leaves all his 
gas coupons to Edward Vachula, in the 
hope that Eddie may drive to school in a 
car as much as Albert did. 

EDWARD MALINOWSKI . . . leaves his 
practical jokes to John Besko, so that John 
can keep the girls smiling with this supply 
of corny jokes. Johnny won't have to strain 
his brain thinking them up. 

EDWARD ZIMA . . . leave his overworked 
seat in the Chem. Lab. to John Skarzynski 
with the warning to use it sparingly, lest 
he wear a hole in it during the next year. 

SOPHIE PINKOSKI . . . leaves her tedi- 
ous job of bringing up the rear in enter- 
ing the class rooms to Mary Silva, in the 
hope that Mary will try to carry on for 
Sophie. 

VERA MIELESKO . . . leaves all her 
fatal excuses to Laura Sadoski. Although 
they always proved fatal, Vera tried real 
hard to make them prove otherwise, and 
she hopes Laura may make them work. 

To THE FRESHMEN . . . bless their 
hearts, we leave the unequalled joy of gig- 
gling at nothing; the pains and pleasures 
of puppy love, which they will be very sure 
is not puppy love, and our ambitions that 
we never quite achieved. 

To THE SOPHOMORES . . . alas, we have 
nothing to offer that would seem of value to 
them. What could we leave them? Our 
sincere hope that they can stand up under 
the shock when they discover, as they will, 
that even the most tempting looking apple 
can conceal a worm in its core. 

To THE JUNIORS . . . our successors, 
we bequeath the joy and zest of competing 
for class honors, a taste of sorrow for those 
who don't quite make the grade, and quiet 
pride for those who do. 

In Witness Whereof, We, the Class of '44 
the testators, to this, our will, written on 
one sheet of parchment, set our hand and 
seal this fifteenth day of June, Anno 
Domini: 1944. 

Signed: HELEN SEROWICK '44 

SOPHY CACKOWSKI '44 

LAURA BIELECKI '44 



SMITH ACADEMY 



19 



Presentation of Class Gift 



Another four years of our school life 
are finished, and our graduation marks the 
last time we meet together as a high school 
class. But as we go, we all find abundant 
cause to remember our school with grati- 
tude. As a symbol of gratitude, and also be- 
cause we would like to be remembered as a 



part of Smith Academy, we wish to present 
to Smith Academy, this Lectern with the 
hope that it will not only serve as a me- 
mory of the class of 1944, but will also be 
a help to the students of Smith Academy 
in the years to come. 

EDWARD L. MALINOWSKI '44 



Address to Undergraduates 



In past years, the graduates of Smith 
Academy have looked forward to taking a 
place in the nation's industry, or continu- 
ing their education along the lines of their 
own interests. It is not that way today. 

Almost over night our country decreed 
that boys are now men and girls are women. 
We have been called upon to do our part 
in a cause which stands before us at both 
a great challenge and a great opportunity 
for services. Many of us are soon to train 
for military service on land or sea or in 
the air. 

As we gather here, in peace and com- 
fort, it is with the realization that our 
country is one of the few in which there 
is no fear of falling bombs. It is with the 
realization that human relations of the 
world are like a raging volcano, once a 
mountain of beauty and inspiration, now a 
source of fire and destruction. And our fu- 
ture and that of our country and our way 
of I'.Ie depends upon the outcome of this 
seething tangle of human relations. 

In this critical situation the youth of 
America can be relied upon to fulfil every 
expectation. There are many things to affect 
our lives over which we have little or no 
control, yet there are important factors 
onto which we shall hold fast. Our pledge 
is that, come what may, our faith will be 
unshaken, our interest will be sustained, and 
we will work at whatever tasks are as- 
signed. 



Our high school work is completed, and 
the time has come when we can pause to 
reflect upon what we have gained during 
our course here. Our work in the classrooms 
has taught us how to think. Athletic con- 
tests have taught us to play according to 
the rules. Class meetings have given us 
practice in the democratic way of life. In 
all our s:hool activities, we have been 
learning the value of loyalty, cooperation, 

We have learned that if our way of life 
is to survive, our leaders in political and 
community life must be worthy of the faith 
of the people. It is their business to guard 
the interests of the country so that it will 
be possible for us to live the way we want 
to live. 

Leaders can only reflect the characteris- 
tics of those who choose them to lead. If 
our leaders are to be faithful, interested, 
capable and honest, those characteristics 
must prevail in the ones who choose the 
leaders. 

That is why education is important. So, to 
you undergraduates, who have years of 
school work still before you, we say: "Make 
the most of your opportunities in educa- 
tion. Do your best in the time that is left 
to you, so that you may be prepared for 
whatever task lies before you. The Class of 
1944 wishes you success." 

EDWARD ZIMA '44 



20 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



The Faculty 




First Row, left to right: Bridget O'Neill, Mary E. Ryan, Margaret L. Connelly, Florence 

E. Muller, Margaret E. Stoddard. 
Second Row, left to right: Principal Clarence J. Larkin, Superintendent Gilbert D. 

Bristol, Joseph Bart, John C. Jakobek. 



s!« :£ Ofi 



CLARENCE J. LARKIN, A.B., Principal Amherst College 

Algebra, Chemistry, Geometry, Aeronautics 
JOHN C. JAKOBEK, A.B., M.S. Mass. State College 

Biology, Science, History, Problems of Democracy 
GILBERT D. BRISTOL, B.V.A. Mass. State College 

Superintendent of Schools 
JOSEPH BART, B.S. Mass. State College 

Agriculture Instructor 
MARY E. RYAN, A.B. Smith College 

Classical English, Commercial English 3-4 
MARGARET E. STODDARD McCarthy's Business College 

Shorthand, Typing, Business Arithmetic 
FLORENCE E. MULLER, A.B. Wheaton College 

Latin, French, World History 
BRIDGET C. O'NEILL Bay Path Institute, Commercial College, New York University 

Shorthand, Commercial English 1-2, Business Training, Bookkeeping 
MARGARET L. CONNELLY Worcester Domestic Science School 

Household Arts Instructor 



SMITH ACADEMY 



21 



Dear Diary, September 28 

Today the Student Council announced the success of its first campaign. A goal 
of $500 was set for the Fourth War Drive. S. A. students and faculty went way "over 
the top" and bought a grand total of $1025.25 in bonds and stamps. Congratulations 
and hurray! For brand new members, they're doing fine! Keep up the good work, 
Student Council. In honor of the occasion, John happened to have his camera and 
snapped this picture of the group. 



Student Council 




First Row, left to right: Edward Malinowski, Irene Zelewicz, Mary Majeski, Edward 

Paszek. 
Second Row, left to right: William Wendoloski, Rita Godin, Evelyn Szewczyk, Stanley 

Kirejczyk, Mr. Larkin. 
Not in Picture: Verna Skorupski. 

OFFICERS 

EDWARD MALINOWSKI, President VERNA SKORUPSKI, Secretary 

EDWARD PASZEK, Vice-President MARY MAJESKI, Treasurer 

MR. LARKIN, Adviser 

* * * 
Dear Diary, September 10 

Tonight we went to the Victory Fair which was sponsored by the Future Farmers 
of America, Hatfield Chapter. This fair was a great success and was well attended 
by interested townspeople. The exhibits included the "Aggie" boys' farm produce 
and the "H. A." girls' canned goods, supplemented by the many entries of the town 
housewives and farmers. There was also a charming flower exhibit. Prizes were 
awarded by the M. S. C. Agriculture Extension Service. S. A.'s boys and girls captured 
a few prizes. We all hope that this fair will become an annual event. 



22 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Today something else happened. Mr. Larkin announced the new School Paper 
Staff. Here is a picture which Dottie took this afternoon. 



School Paper Staff 




First Row, left to right: Edward Paszek, Edith Filipek, Rita Godin, Helen Serowick, 
Irene Zelewicz, Frances Lizak, William Wendoloski. 

Second Row, left to right: Miss Stoddard, Miss Ryan, Sophy Cackowski, Vera Mielesko, 
Jean Bryant, Velma Omasta, Janet Zuchowski, Stella Sliwoski, Eleanore Kugler, 
Mary Silva, Mr. Larkin. 

Third Row, left to right: Martha Osepowicz, Helen Paszek, Tessie Michalowski. 
Chester Prucnal, John Skarzynski, Robert Pelc, Mary Majeski, Margaret Ose- 
powicz. 

Not in Picture: Verna Skorupski, Albert Vachula, Edward Zima, Elizabeth Wilkes. 



Editor-in-Chief Helen Serowick 

Associate Editors Rita, Godin, Irene Zelewicz, Verna Skorupski 

Literary Editors . Stella Sliwoski, Jean Bryant 

Sports Editors Helen Paszek, Albert Vachula 

Feature Editors Frances Lizak, William Wendoloski 

Art Editor Chester Prucnal 

Business Manager Edward Paszek 

Assistant Business Managers John Skarzynski, Edward Zima 

News Reporters Janet Zuchowski, Velma Omasta, Mary Silva, Elizabeth 

Wilkes, Robert Pelc, Sophy Cackowski, Vera Mielesko, Mary Majeski 

Typists Edith Filipek, Martha Osepowicz, Margaret 

Osepowicz, Tessie Michalowski. Eleanore Kugler 
Faculty Advisers Principal Larkin, Miss Ryan, Miss Stoddard 



SMITH ACADEMY 



V6 



Dear Diary, October 4. 

Have just come home from the Freshman Reception and what fun! It was planned 
by the Junior Class and was deemed very successful by all who attended. The fresh- 
men, as usual, were good sports about their initiations and a new feature was the 
Reception line, consisting of the faculty and the Junior Class officers. This served to 
more fully acquaint the freshmen with the faculty, (and vice versa). Refreshments 
of cookies and ice cream were served, and the "V and T" Orchestra played for dancing. 
Hope the sophomore social turns out as well. 



Class elections were held today, with 
FRESHMAN 
BERNARD SAWICKI, President 
LEONARD KARPINSKI, Vice-President 
WALTER KUCHYT, Secretary 
MARGARET VACHULA, Treasurer 

SOPHOMORE 
MARIE KORZA, President 
CAROLYN KOSIOR, Vice-President 
VELMA OMASTA, Secretary 
JOAN BANGS, Treasurer 



the following results: 

JUNIOR 
ELEANORE KUGLER, President 
EVELYN VACHULA, Vice-President 
MARTHA OSEPOWICZ, Secretary 
CHESTER PRUCNAL, Treasurer 

SENIOR 
EDWARD PASZEK, President 
EDWARD MALINOWSKI, Vice-President 
IRENE ZELEWICZ, Secretary 
EDITH FILIPEK, Treasurer 



Dottie took these pictures of the classes yesterday: 



Junior Class 




First Row, left to right: Tessie Michalowski, Margaret Osepowicz, Martha Osepowicz, 

Eleanore Kugler, Evelyn Vachula, Chester Prucnal, Rita Godin, Anna Zima. 
Second Row, left to right: Mrs. O'Neill, Helen Paszek, Gladys Maciorowski, Laura 

Sadoski, Frances Lizak, Jean Bryant, Elizabeth Zapka, Stella Sliwoski, Mary Silva, 

Mr. Jakobek. 
Third Row, left to right: Adolph Ciszewski, William Wendoloski, John Skarzynski, 

Robert Shea, Clyde Gallant, Clifford Roberts, Robert Mullins. 



24 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Sophomore Class 




First Row, left to right: Shirley Labbee, Shirley Eberlein, Joan Bangs, Velma Omasta, 

Carolyn Kosior, Marie Korza, Victoria Zawacki. 
Second Row, left to right: Mr. Larkin, Pauline Widelo, Gertrude Petrikoski, Barbara 

Tobacco, Shirley Betsold, Ruth Zuroff, Jennie Cackowski, Evelyn Szewczyk, Nellie 

Korza, Miss Connelly. 
Third Row, left to right: Stanley Pinkoski, Robert Pelc, William Mullins, Lawrence 

Stoddard, Edward Kraulis. 



Dear Diary, February 17 

Today I noticed for the first time some of the current fashion fads of S. A. With 
the males the ci-ew or G. I. haircut is the latest style and their favorite girls' hair 
ribbon in the lapel marks the S. A. sheiks. The girls are wearing the ever-popular 
scuffies, skirts and sweaters with the accent on flowers in the hair and a pin showing 
what division of the service you're faithful to. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



25 



Freshman Class 




P'irst Row, left to right: Helen Michalowski, Jennie Maiewski, Margaret Wentzel, 

Walter Kuehyt, Albert Sawicki, Leonard Karpinski, Janet Zuchowski, Valeria 

Matusiewicz. 
Second Row, left to right: John Fortsch, Gertrude Zembiski, Pauline Zapka, Joanne 

Howard, Annette Kempisty, Irene Kraulis, Stasia Kostek, Lucy Szych, Carl 

Nartowicz, Mrs. Muller. 
Third Row, left to right: Mr. Bart, Edward Szewczyk, Alex Widelo, Carl Raffa, 

Robert Cutter, Myron Sikorski, Arthur Proulx, Stanley Kirejczyk, James McGraw, 

Richard Labbee. 
Not in Picture: Margaret Vachula, Edward Vachula, Edward Majeskey, Bernice 

Buckowski. 



Dear Diary, October 7 

I noticed today that the freshmen are rapidly learning S.A's "Slanguage." Just 
a few samples are: 

SLANGUAGE ENGLISH MEANING 

"Come to the party" . . . . . . . . Come to your senses 

"Get in the groove or get on the ball" ...... Use your head 

"Hit the blue book" ........ Receive a good mark 

"Who hung that sack on you" ... A compliment on good-looking apparel 

"Heat professor" . . . Teacher who gives long and difficult assignments 
"Brooming" ......... Traveling at great speed 

"Brown" ..... One who flatters a teacher to improve marks 

"May I borrow your frame for the next struggle?" . . May I have the next dance? 



26 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Honor Essays 



A PURPOSE IN LIFE 

At this time of graduation, in spite of 
many cares and anxieties, a surge of pride 
and interest stirs in the hearts of us who 
graduate. The reassuring strength of this 
formality is an inspiration for a lifetime of 
work and good purpose. We who are grad- 
uating do not claim to see clearly before 
us the purpose of each individual life, but 
it is clear to us that each must do a job 
and work with a purpose. 

There was an idea and a purpose in the 
mind of Benjamin Franklin when he ran 
away from his home and went to Philadel- 
phia. He was born the fifteenth of seventeen 
children, in a poor family. Therefore, he 
had no special advantage, and knew he 
could not achieve his purpose if he stayed at 
home. Franklin's life was outstanding in 
many ways. He was known as America's 
patron saint of common sense, for in 
everything he did and said, and in every- 
thing he wrote there was evidence of plain 
common sense. The life and achievement of 
such a person as Franklin is impressive; for 
his was a life with a purpose, and it has 
had an influence upon the American people 
for two hundred years. 

Living at a different time, and with a 
completely different idea, but alike domin- 
ated by an intense purpose, was Florence 
Nightingale, English philanthropist and 
social worker, who was born in 1820 in 
Italy, in the city of Florence, for which city 
she was named. She was dominated by a 
desire to use her talent for the benefit of 
humanity. Her social position was such that 
she could have had a life of ease and pro- 
tection, but on all this she turned her back 
for a purpose which dominated her life. Our 
own day is greatly indebted to Florence 
Nightingale. The modern trained nurse, 
with all that she means to health and com- 



fort, was invisioned by this courageous 
pioneer with purpose in her life. 

Today, we are beginning a new life, and 
we are all making the right kind of a start. 
But — have we the power to see our purpose 
through ? Ten years, or even five years from 
now, will we still have the same faith, the 
same enthusiasm, and the same purpose? 
It is not hard to be a good starter. We all 
know persons who are forever starting off 
on a new enterprise in a veritable splurge 
of enthusiasm. But all too often both the 
enthusiasm and the purpose fade, after the 
first difficulties are encountered. 

Great people, like Benjamin Franklin and 
Florence Nightingale, did not achieve suc- 
cess in a moment. Their lives were success- 
ful because they patiently did the thousand, 
small, uninteresting jobs that needed to be 
done, and did each well. We must remem- 
ber that we cannot leave one small task 
uncompleted, or the whole structure of our 
purpose may collapse. Living with a pur- 
pose is truly a matter of seeing each task 
through to the very end. 

We have a difficult task before us. There 
is a war to be won, a peace to be made, 
and a world to be restored. We know that 
there is always a struggle between the good 
and the bad, between those who would build 
and those who would destroy. It is our pur- 
pose to seek the good and to support it, 
undaunted by obstacles that will confront, 
us. 

Our graduation is a reminder that there 
is work to do, and that we who now grad- 
uate have a responsibility made greater by 
the graduation; that there is a job for 
every one of us, and that we must each 
do our part with faith and purpose. 

IRENE ZELEWICZ, 

Salutatorian. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



27 



WHAT OF THE FUTURE? 

In all the history of civilization there 
never was an age of greater convenience 
than the present. Countless generations have 
built up for us a world of immeasurable 
opportunity. Discovery and invention have 
enabled us to travel like the wind itself 
across land or sea in this modern world. The 
radio weaves its mysterious path through 
the ether waves, and makes it possible for 
us to tune in any station in the country, 
or across the sea. 

But, as we consider the war-torn world of 
today, we find ourselves asking: "What use 
is all this magic? What good are all the 
scientific discoveries, if they are to be used 
for new methods of warfare?" Moments of 
reflection have led us to the conclusion that 
all the greatest things in life can be mis- 
used, and become a power for evil instead 
of for good. 

For example, ambition, the desire to pos- 
sess and surpass, to be more than other 
people are, has left a blood-stained trail 
across history. Nevertheless, in spite of the 
ruinous meaning that ambition can have, 
none of us who hope to amount to anything 
can be without it. It is one of the most 
powerful driving forces of our life. Again, 
the urge to fight can express itself in sheer 
savagery, or it can have a meaning far 
beyond the realms of physical violence. Pug- 
nacity may appear in a gunman, contentious 
and reckless; or it may appear in a group 
of scientists who are battling some plague, 
like tuberculosis. Pugnacity may wreck a 
cafe in a riotous brawl, or it may go into 
a pulpit to fight a social evil. All of these 
instincts can be abused, but they can also 
be made the most valuable part of our 
equipment for life. They should be neither 
surrendered to nor cast out. They must be 
harnessed and made to work for us. 

The plight of the world today makes us 
realize how great is the necessity for 



honor, unselfishness, and loyalty — for all 
those traits of character, which help us 
to harness our instincts and make them 
work for good, rather than evil. Abra- 
ham Lincoln clung to his ideals of justice 
through all adverse criticism, because he 
felt that his ideals were sacred. George 
Washington and his troops withstood the 
horrors of Valley Forge with such memor- 
able fortitude because they felt their loyalty 
was sacred. Martyrs have gone to the stake 
rather than lie, because to them their honor 
was sacred. 

This element of nobility in character is 
not something- that can be assumed for the 
occasion and then cast off again. It is some- 
thing that must be woven into one's inner 
consciousness... It is that sure and sensitive 
taste that makes us instinctively shrink 
from any action that might violate those 
qualities we hold sacred. 

Our education has already laid for most 
of us the roots of our mental and moral 
training. And we must nurture and encour- 
age those roots. We must remember that 
every time we crush a selfish or disloyal 
impulse, we have strengthened not only our 
self-esteem but also our value to the world 
as a whole. 

Each of us leaving school today has 
something in which he is personally in- 
terested; and it is natural for us to put 
our own interests first and foremost. How- 
ever, this terrible conflict in which the 
world now struggles shows us very clearly 
how dangerous it is to try to live contrary 
to the rules. It is dangerous to individuals, 
to nations, and to the peace of mankind 
in general. Therefore, we should remember 
that our individual interests must be bal- 
anced in some way with community inter- 
ests. Otherwise, our American way of life 
can not long survive. 

VERNA SKORUPSKI, 

Third Honors. 



28 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



ON THE YOUTH OF TODAY RESTS THE 
DEMOCRACY OF TOMORROW 

As groups are gathered today all across 
this country for high school graduations, 
practically all are welcomed with similar 
formality yet with different words because 
of different community interests. Yet all 
cherish one thing in common, and that is 
their country — a country in which so many 
things so widely different are possible. 

This country, the United States of Amer- 
ica, was the hope of the world in 1918, and 
in the years immediately following, and it 
has been the hope of the past generation. 
In the last few years, the world has turned 
to our country again with hope that we 
could do what they have failed to do. The 
tremendous productive capacity of our coun- 
try has been put into action with results 
that astound us all even the men who knew 
this capacity best but failed to appreciate 
how great it was. In a two-year period our 
industries have turned from the production 
of the goods of pea?e to the materials of 
war. Tanks, airplanes, guns and transport 
are sliding down the ways daily and roll- 
ing out of factories in a volume which 
nearly anyone would have thought impos- 
sible only a year or so ago. 

We are doing whatever we can to help 
win this war and then we are going to do 
whatever we can to improve matters on 
the home front. As we graduate from school 
today, millions of Americans are spread out 
to cover practically every spot on earth in 
large or small forces, in cities and coun- 
tries in far-away places, on major or minor 
battlefronts of the war some in places we 
never knew existed. 

These Americans go into battle with an 
important factor which the Axis soldiers 
cannot have. They go with the feeling that 
they are fighting for the right to have some- 
thing to say about the way they live in 
time of peace, although, under military rule 
in time of war much of that freedom is 
given up for war efficiency. The Axis sol- 
dier has never reacted to that inspiration, 
for he has never known what that freedom 



meant. His life has always been one of 
making his bow, hour by hour, to someone 
high in authority, whether he wants to 
make that bow or not. To question authority 
of the dictators might easily mean his own 
execution. This inspiration is going to be 
just as important in the determination of 
pcst-war events as it is in determining the 
outcome of the war. When the destructive 
fores now at work winning the war can be 
turned to good purpose, perhaps these 
people will have an opportunity to see the 
life for which the Americans are fighting. 

It is the youth of today which has the 
most at stake in the future. The youth and 
young adults of today are putting in the 
punches and firing the guns which will win 
the war. We graduates are the ones who 
will be the most affected by what goes on 
during the period of reconstruction and 
peace which is coming. We are the ones 
who will benefit the most by turning all 
this destructive power back to good pur- 
pose. We are the ones who have the longest 
and greatest stake in turning all our factor- 
ies back to making the things which add 
joy and pleasure to the day at work. We 
will be expected to help to make it possible 
for more people to have better and more 
comfortable homes in which to live. It will 
be our task to promote better living condi- 
tions throughout the country, and indeed, 
throughout the world. 

We believe the young people all over the 
earth want a more democratic world after 
this war. We are not going to be just a 
war-weary people when the last battle is 
won. We are going to be ready then to turn 
to the things which are of real benefit to 
mankind. In that direction and to that end 
we are going to turn back to good purpose 
all the power which is now used in destroy- 
ing the forces which prevent a free, demo- 
cratic way of life. The future is ours, and 
it is for us to determine what it shall be. 
"On the youth of today rests the democ- 
racy of tomorrow." 

MARY MAJESKI, 

Valedictorian. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



29 



Boys' Basketball Team 




First Row, left to right: John Skarzynski, Edward Malinowski, Capt. Edward Zima, 

Robert Shea, Albert Vachula. 
Second Row, left to right: Manager Chester Prucnal, Robert Pelc, Joseph Blyda, 

Bernard Kacinski, Coach Jakobek. 
Not in Picture: John Besko, Assistant Manager Edward Paszek. 



Basketball had a very successful year at Smith. All during the second half, our 
team was undefeated until the last game with Hopkins. Until this game, the Hamp- 
shire League title had been undecided. Captain Edward Zima and Edward Malinowski 
were among the high scorers of the league. 



SCHEDULE 

FIRST HALF SECOND HALF 

South Hadley 20 Smith Academy 36 Sauth Hadley 25 Smith Academy 37 

Smith School 13 Smith Academy 38 Smith School 19 Smith Academy 42 

Amherst 46 Smith Academy 33 Amherst 28 Smith Academy 29 



South Deerfield 17 Smith Academy 27 
Easthampton 23 Smith Academy 17 



South Deerfield 20 Smith Academy 37 
Easthampton 40 Smith Academy 42 



Hopkins 



34 Smith Academy 19 



Hopkins 



27 Smith Academy 23 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Soccer Team 




First Row, left to right: John Skarzynski, William Wendoloski, Edward Malinowski, 
Henry Betsold, Robert Pelc. 

Second Row, left to right: Manager Edward Paszek, Stanley Kirejczyk, Adolph Ols- 
zewski, Clyde Gallant, Robert Shea, Walter Kuchyt, Clifford Roberts, Coach 
Jakobek. 

Not in picture: Capt. Albert Vachula, Edward Zima. 



Our boys brought to Smith Academy the first soccer championship in the five 
years since the Hampshire Soccer League has been established. The team came up 
with many surprising victories. Captain Albert Vachula, high scorer, tallied three 
goals at critical times, and tipped the scales in Smith Academy's favor. 



Springfield Tech 

Smith School 1 

Hopkins 2 

Easthampton 





SCHEDULE 


Smith Academy 


1 


Smith School 


Smith Academy 


2 


Hcpkins 


Smith Academy 


2 


Easthampton 


Smith Academy 


4 





1 Smith Academy 2 
Smith Academy 
Smith Academy 1 



SMITH ACADEMY 



31 



Baseball Team 




First Row, left to right: Edward Malinowski, Adolph Ciszewski, Robert Pelc, Robert 

Shea, Clifford Roberts, Arthur Proulx. 
Second Row, left to right: Stanley Kirejczyk, John Skarzynski, Charles Drake, Henry 

Betsold, Lawrence Stoddard, Coach Jakobek. 



Until our coach discovered that Edward Vachula, a freshman, is a star pitcher, 
our team had not been winning any games. Although this year baseball has not been 
as successful as the other sports, we are looking forward to a championship next 
year. Edward Vachula and Robert Shea will probably do all the work on the mound 
next year, with Bernard Kacenski behind the plate. 









SCHEDULE 




Easthampton 


9 


Smith Academy 


1 


Amherst 


6 


Smith School 


27 


Smith Academy 


5 


Smith School 


4 


Northampton 


13 


Smith Academy 


8 


Amherst 


18 


Hopkins 


7 


Smith Academy 


4 


Easthampton 


3 



Smith Academy 2 

Smith Academy 19 

Smith Academy 

Smith Academy 2 



32 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Girls' Basketball Team 




First Row, left to right: Eleanore Kugler, Margaret Osepowiez, Helen Paszek, Capt. 

Anna Zima, Tessie Michalowski, Martha Osepowkz. 
Second Row, left to right: Manager Mary Majeski, Shirley Labbee, Victoria Zawacki, 

Marie Korza, Clara Toczydlowski, Mrs. Muller. 



Although the girls' basketball season started late, because of late organization in 
the school in near-by towns, we managed to get a number of games despite the prob- 
lems of war-time transportation. 



The team was under the leadership of Coach Muller and under the management 
of Mary Majeski. The girls who played forward were Capt. Anna Zima, Helen Paszek, 
Tessie Michalowski, and Shirley Labbee. Eleanore Kugler, Martha and Margaret 
Osepowiez, and Marie Korza held the guard positions. A summary of the games 
indicates that the team made great progress during the season, which closed with a 
victory over our ancient rival, Hopkins. 



Jan. 11 S. A. 5 
Feb. 3 S. A. 5 
Feb. 29 S. A. 18 
Feb. 15 S. A. 8 
March 10 S. A. 50 



Deerfield 38 

Deerfield 55 

Northampton 32 

Northampton 46 

South Hadley 9 



March 10 S. A. 35 Sanderson A. 27 

March 15 S. A. 18 Sanderson A. 8 

March 22 S. A. 29 South Hadley 9 

March 28 S. A. 21 Hopkins 26 

April 4 S. A. 35 Hopkins 22 



SMITH ACADEMY 33 

School News 

Dear Diary, October 11. 

Today a combined Columbus and Pulaski Day program was presented in the 
Assembly Hall by members of the Student Council. The singing of the "Star Spangled 
Banner" and the "Pledge of the Flag" led by William Wendoloski, opened the pro- 
gram. The chairman, Rita Godin, spoke briefly on the observance of the holidays 
and then dedicated the program to Leon Korza, a former S. A. student, who was re- 
ported killed in action on duty with the Navy at sea. Speakers and their subjects were: 
Verna Skorupski, "Question for Americans"; Irene Zelewicz, "Casmir Pulaski"; Wil- 
liam Wendoloski, "Christopher Columbus"; and Edward Paszek, "Freedom Lives." 
The program closed with the singing of the school song with Jean Bryant as accom- 
panist. 



Dear Diary, October 28 

SophomOre social tonight and it was a grand party! We played games which 
were loads of fun and a special feature was a Fortune Teller, Madam Zambini. We 
had swell refreshments of cider and doughnuts and the "V and T" orchestra played 
for dancing. The party was declared a success by all. 



Dear Diary, November 10 

Today Miss Marion Billings, a canteen worker in France during World War I. 
was guest speaker at an assembly program. Miss Billings spoke entertainingly and 
interestingly on some of her experiences in France while on duty there. A program 
of music followed, with Miss Boyle at the piano. Soccer letters were presented to our 
championship soccer team by Coach John C. Jakobek. The program closed with the 
singing of the "Star Spangled Banner" and the School Song. Edward Paszek was 
chairman. 



Dear Diary, November 21 

Lots of things happened today! First of all, the faculty (lucky ones) were treated 
to a Thanksgiving dinner prepared and served by the H. A. girls under the direction 
of Miss Connelly. 

We also had a Thanksgiving observance in the form of a radio play. Rita Godin 
was chairman and those taking part were Edward Paszek, Henry Betsold, Frances 
Lizak, Eleanore Kugler, Helen Paszek, and William Wendoloski. A program of Thanks- 
giving melodies was sung, closing with the School Song. 

* * * 

Dear Diary, November 28 

Today the Student Council again made itself heard when it presented the movie, 
"Gulliver's Travels." Everybody enjoyed it tremendously and is looking forward to 
the next one. 

Dear Diary, December 17 

Today, twelve members of the school paper staff attended the convention of the 
Western Massachusetts League of School Publications at Westfield High School. 



34 PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 

The buffet supper served at 6:30 consisted of tuna fish salad sandwiches, dill pickles, 
olives, stuffed celery, potato chips, strawberry sundaes and hot chocolate. 

The session after supper opened with a lecture, "School Journalists: Leaders in 
Democratic Living" by Dr. Maxwell H. Goldberg, professor of English at Massachusetts 
State College. Dr. Goldberg stated that: (1) There is a special need for this em- 
phasis — to counteract the chronic habit of hatred evoked by the following: (a) the 
economic depression of the late 'twenties and the 'thirties; (b) the hate propaganda 
of the Nazis and other enemies of democracy; (c) the hate forced on us by the War. 
(2) Student journalists have excellent opportunity and urgent duty to foster sym- 
pathy, good-will, understanding, and fair play as the great cementing powers of 
democratic life. 

The yearbook discussion was led by Professor Frederick S. Conlin, head of the 
English Department at Westfield State Teachers' College. Roscoe S. Scott, chief West- 
field correspondent for the "Springfield Union," conducted the discussion on newspaper 
work. After the round table discussion adjourned, the students went to the gym for 
dancing. The music was supplied by a victrola and colored beams of light were used 
instead of ceiling lights. The following delegates represented "The Purple and White 
Echo"; Helen Serowick, Irene Fox, Verna Skorupski, Rita Godin, Frances Lizak, Mary 
Majeski, Edith Filipek, Chester Prucnal, William Wendoloski, Adolph Ciszewski, and 
Miss Ryan and Miss Stoddard, faculty advisers. 

We also had another movie, "The Plainsman." (Gary Cooper — ummm!) 



Dear Diary, December 23 

Had a busy day today, at school because among other things, vacation started! 
Am I sorry! 

We had a Christmas assembly today. Mrs. Muller treated us with two songs, 
accompanied by Miss Ryan. Her solos were "Oh Holy Night" and "Virgin's Slumber 
Song." The rest of the program consisted of carol singing by the chorus, and closed 
with the school song. Jean Bryant served as accompanist. 

Miss Holmes brought over and demonstrated the radio bought with the money 
we gave in the Junior Red Cross Drive. Here's hoping that the boys at the Westover 
Base Hospital get as much enjoyment from it as we did in buying it for them. 

Mr. Larkin announced that plans are being completed for the senior play to be 
held in January. Tryouts have been held and rehearsals will get under way after 
vacation. 

We had Bing Crosby today in "The Starmaker." 



Dear Diary, January 28 

Senior Play Tonight! 

"Huckleberry Finn" proved to be a great success. Character parts were played 
realistically by a well chosen cast; each member of which took on a new personal- 
ity as he stepped on the stage. For example, Frances Lizak, as Aunt Sally and Edith 
Filipek as Mrs. Hotchkiss, worked out excellent representations as middle-aged mothers 
of nearly grown-up daughters. Mary Majeski was a pet, mischievous little girl as 
Matilda, Aunt Sally's daughter and Helen Serowick was excellent as Glory Belle 
Hotchkiss, the daughter who finally asserted herself. The title role of "Huck Finn" 
was well taken by Adolph Ciszewski, who in his overalls and straw hat, was certainly 



SMITH ACADEMY 



35 



the "Huck" of Mark Twain's book come to life. His bosom pal, Tom Sawyer, was 
realistically played by Edward Lapinski, who proved to be a most capable, and as 
ever, adventure-loving, Tom. The Wilks' girls introduced in the dramatization, were 
played by Irene Fox, as Mary Jane, who was nineteen and in love; Jean Bryant, as 
Susan, who, as all fifteen-year-old girls, was vain, bossy, and just a little bit proud 
of herself; and Laura Bielecki, as Joanna, the practical and lively fourteen-year-old 
girl of the Wilks' family. Edward Paszek played the role of a confidence man, and 
the King, Charles Drake was his accomplice, the Duke. They certainly did enliven 
the comedy in their dual roles. The good friend of the family, Dr. Robinson, who was 
in love with Mary Jane, was successfully portrayed by Bill Wendoloski. The final 
touch of the old South in the play, with a slight tinge of romance and humor, was 
added by the character parts of Jim, a runaway slave, played by Henry Betsold; and 
Lize, Aunt Sally's superstitious colored maid, portrayed by Rita Godin. Costumes were 
realistic and the whole atmosphere was much like the original setting of the story. 
The finale of the play came with Aunt Sally's traditional threat to "Huck," "Oh, no 
you don't! I lay, I'll civilize you or die trying'!" 

Mary snapped this picture of the cast after dress rehearsal this P. M. 



Dramatic Club and Senior Play Cast 




First Row, left to right: Mary Majeski, Frances Lizak, Edith Filipek, Laura Bielecki, 
Irene Zelewicz, Helen Serowick, Rita Godin, Eleanore Kugler. 

Second Row, left to right: Miss Ryan, William Wendoloski, Charles Drake, Adolph 
Ciszewski, Edward Paszek, Henry Betsold, Jean Bryant. 

Not in Picture: Edward Lapinski, John Skarzynski. 



36 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Dear Diary, February 10 

Today Mr. Larkin announced the 1944 Year Book staff. Here is a picture and 
the lineup: 



Yearbook Staff 




""«~ai 



First Row, left to right: Edward Paszek, Rita Godin, Helen Serowick, Irene Zelewicz, 

Sophy Cackowski, William Wendoloski. 
Second Row, left to right: Miss Stoddard, Miss Ryan, John Skarzynski, Edward 

Malinowski, Edith Filipek, Mary Majeski, Helen Paszek, Mr. Larkin. 
Not in Picture: Edward Zima, Albert Vachula, Verna Skorupski. 



Editor-in-Chief Helen Serowick 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief Rita Godin 

Feature Editors Sophy Cackowski, Irene Zelewicz 

Sports Editors Helen Paszek, Albert Vachula 

Literary Editors Mary Majeski, Verna Skorupski 

Photographic Editors Edith Filipek, Edward Malinowski 

Business Manager Edward Paszek 

Assistant Business Managers William Wendoloski, John Skarzynski, 

Edward Zima 
Faculty Advisers Principal Larkin, Miss Ryan, Miss Stoddard 



SMITH ACADEMY 



37 



Dear Diary, March 10 

The picture "Beau Geste" — the stars, Gary Cooper, Brian Aherne. 
Unbeatable . . . you bet! 



Dear Diary, 

Henry Fonda in "Young Mr. Lincoln." 
What a picture! 



March 1 



Dear Diary, March 15 

Today our Pro Merito Society presented an assembly for the purpose of re- 
minding everyone of the existence of this organization and of introducing it to the 
freshmen. We also were shown some movies taken in 1941, when the Pro Merito State 
Convention held here in Hatfield which Miss Ryan commented on. 

This is a cute picture of the Pro Merito's, isn't it? 



Pro Merito 




Front Row, left to right: Rita Godin, Mary Majeski, Eleanore Kugler, Jean Bryant. 
Second Row, left to right: Miss Ryan, William Wendoloski, Stella Sliwoski, Miss 
Stoddard. 

OFFICERS 

MARY MAJESKI, President ELEANORE KUGLER, Vice-President 

RITA GODIN, Secretary-Treasurer 

MISS RYAN AND MISS STODDARD, Faculty Advisers 



38 PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 

Dear Diary, March 20 

Bill Wendoloski's essay was entered in the M. S. C. basketball tournament today 
as the best entry from S. A. Here it is: 
Dear Jim, 

"I guess you know we're all mighty proud of you here back home; proud of the 
way you waded into the bloody torrent of war, and proud of the way you're advancing 
against the swirling currents. And YOU know what you are fighting for — the kind 
of things you knew and loved back home. I guess it all seems kind of far-away to 
you now — the old square dances Wednesday nights, the occasional movie with your 
girl, the Mom and Pop always there to help you along when the going was bad — 
but with the kind of goal, and the brand of courage that you men have, there can 
be no doubt that you will all come marching back into the old home town soon. 

In Valley Forge, their blood was frozen on their bare feet; in the Civil War they 
stood face to face and blasted the hell out of each other without flinching. So it 
is now that you men, packed in muddy, filthy, sweating foxholes, or charging the 
Jap — infested jungles, or wading into German guns in Italy, display the same spirit 
that made America; the spirit that IS America. 

Do you remember, Jim, the time you fell and broke your arm while playing in 
the basketball tournament? Do you remember how both teams bent over you with 
honest concern in their faces; and how the opposing team sent you a letter cheering 
you up? That is AMERICA! Do you remember the day your dad let you have the 
car for the first time and you dented the fender? And when you stood in front of 
Dad and bravely told him the whole story, offering to work it out, he patted your 
shoulder and said that the manly way you came to him was payment enough? 

That is AMERICA, Jim, the America you dream of coming back to; and it's 
all here, waiting for you when your job is done. Not one can appreciate her more 
than you who are fighting for her. 

Yes, we're MIGHTY proud of you, Jim. Proud to know you and proud to think 
of you as one of our neighbors. It was because of heroes like you and your buddies 
that this country was born. It is because of heroes like you that this nation lives to 
spread freedom over the world. It is for heroes like you that we home folk work; 
praying that all of you may be here that day when the world again becomes calm." 

Wishing you luck, 

BILL. 



Dear Diary, April 6 

Prize speaking tryouts were held all this week with the following results: 

GIRLS BOYS 

Evelyn Vachula Edward Lapinski 

Evelyn Szewczyk Chester Prucnal 

Tessie Michalowski John Skarzynski 

Frances Lizak Robert Shea 

Jean Bryant Edward Zima 

Alternates were Eleanore Kugler and Elizabeth Wilkes for the girls, and Albert 
Vachula and Charles Havlir for the boys. 



SMITH ACADEMY 39 

Dear Diary, April 7 

Today the Student Council sponsored a paper drive, and by the looks of the 
trucks it was a success! 

We also had another movie today — football story — "The Quarterback." 



Dear Diary, April 19 

Today the seniors got back from their trip to make us all envious — or jealous. 
Here are all the things they did after arriving in Grand Central at 4:05 P. M., Sun- 
day afternoon, April 16. 

Upon arrival transfer was made to the famous Hotel Taft, Times Square, where 
rooms were furnished four persons to a room with radio and private bath. Dinner was 
in the famous Taft Grill to the music of Vincent Lopez. After dinner the party visited 
the Hall of Motion, Radio City. 

April 17 — Following breakfast the party visited the Statue of Liberty on Bedloe's 
Island in New York Harbor. The round trip sail afforded views of New York's skyline, 
Ellis Island, East River bridges and harbor traffic. Returning from this trip luncheon 
was provided at individual's expense enroute to the Bronx Zoo, famous the world 
over for its collection of animals, birds and reptiles. Returning to the Hotel Taft for 
dinner the party spent the evening on a guide conducted tour of the National Broad- 
casting Studios. 

April 18 — After breakfast this morning the party viewed New York, Brooklyn, 
Queens, Long Island and New Jersey from the top of the Empire State Building. 
Twelve hundred and fifty feet above the street, 102 stories, the building has 6400 
windows, 7 miles of elevator shafts and floor space to shelter a city of 80,000 people. 
Following luncheon at individual's expense the party attended the afternoon show 
at Radio City Music Hall. Dinner at the Hotel Taft was followed by a trip to the 
Hayden Planetarium where the mighty Drama of the Skies was unfolded in all its 
majestic splendor and fascinating mystery. 

April 19 — Following breakfast the party was conducted on a sightseeing trip of 
the city by bus and subway, including a visit to Grant's Tomb, Columbia University, 
Fifth Avenue, Riverside Drive and other points of interest. Following luncheon at the 
hotel bags were packed for departure. The afternoon was open for shopping or in- 
dividual activity. Party left the hotel at 4 P. M. for Grand Central Terminal and 
arrived home at 9.11 P. M. 



Dear Diary, May 8 

Today we were introduced to our new Aggie teacher, Mr. Joseph Bart. We cele- 
brated coming back to school after spring-vacation by having a movie, "The Last 
of the Mohicans." 



Dear Diary, May 17 

Today the H. A. girls did it again by giving an out-of-door luncheon for the 
faculty and their friends. What we could see certainly looked swell. 



40 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Future Farmers of America 




First Row, left to right: Edward Szewczyk, Myron Sikorski, Robert Pelc, Mr. Bart, 

Robert Shea, Stanley Pinkoski. 
Not in Picture: John Besko. 



OFFICERS 



JOHN BESKO, President 
BERNARD KACINSKI, Secretary 



JOHN SHEA, Treasurer 
ROBERT PELC, Reporter 



Dear Diary, May 22 

First prizes of $5.00 went to Frances Lizak and Chester Prucnal tonight in the 
Annual Alumni Prize Speaking Contest which was held in Memorial Town Hall. 
Evelyn Szewczyk and Edward Lapinski took second prizes of $2.50. The other speak- 
ers were Evelyn Vachula, Tessie Michalowski, Jean Bi-yant, Robert Shea, John Skar- 
zynski, and Edward Zima, and everyone did a fine job. The winners were announced 
by Rev. Ralph Winn of Haydenville; the other two judges were Miss Fanny Allen 
and Miss Katherine Dwyer of Hopkins Academy. Speakers were coached by Miss 
Mary Ryan of the faculty who was presented a leather compact by the speakers. 

Musical selections by the chorus were "Juanita" and "Finlandia." The music was 
under the direction of Mrs Florence C. Muller of the faculty and Mrs. John Fortsch 
was at the piano. Mrs. Muller was presented a pair of silver clip earrings by the 
speakers and a corsage by the chorus. 

The decorations, arranged by the Junior Class, consisted of large baskets of 
flowering dogwood. Junior ushers were Eleanore Kugler, Elizabeth Wilkes, Rita Godin, 
Anna Zima, Laura Sadoski, Martha and Margaret Osepowicz and Gladys Maciorowski. 
Mary Majeski and Clara Toczydlowski distributed programs. Ushers and decorations 
were under the direction of Mrs O'Neill, junior class advisor. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



41 



Literary 



AN EMBARRASSING SITUATION 

One day while my friend and I were 
downtown shopping-, she decided to buy a 
hat and asked me to accompany her to the 
various hat stores. 

She first decided to try the store just 
across the street and as she and I had never 
been in there, we decided to visit it. No 
sooner had we stepped over the threshold of 
the store than a big, husky lady came bound- 
ing out of somewhere and asked what we 
would like to look at. My friend, who was 
behind me, answered, "Hats." 

"Oh hats," she said, in a loud, foreign 
twang, "We have many kinds of dose — 

dotch, beanie — oh lots of dem. Come 

here, girlie," she beckoned to me, as I was 
the nearest to her. 

"But I don't," I started to say, but she 
didn't pay any attention to what I was 
saying. 

She picked up a hat and said, "There! 
Isn't that adorable |" 

I started again, "But, Miss, it's not me 
who wants one, but my friend." 

But she went right ahead, and with an 
audience looking on, she grabbed a few of 
them and plopped a most horrid-looking one 
on my head and twirled me all around to 
model it for the spectators. 

"Now, isn't that just darling|" she said 
to one of them. "Wouldn't you like one 
just like it?" 

Then, turning back to me, she said, "And 
if you don't like that type of hat, I have 
plenty of other kinds." She went back 
searching for more. My friend just stood in 
the background roaring with laughter, while 
I, filled with embarrassment, started again, 
for the tenth time, to say that I wasn't the 
one wanting a hat. But no! Plop, on my 
head, went another one of those horrid- 
looking hats, with my friend laughing all 
the more, and the audience getting larger 
and larger all the time. After she had 
slapped about four more on, I finally got the 
courage to say in a loud voice, "I don't 
want any hats; in fact, I don't want any- 
thing." And with that I rushed out, my 
friend following behind, laughing heartily. 
BARBARA TOBACCO '46. 



A PLEA FOR BUYING WAR BONDS 
Let's take a look ,at an airport some- 
where near the coast of England. Airplanes 
standing in line for bombing missions, get- 
ting fueled and bomb racks loaded. In a 
few minutes pilots, bombardiers, gunners 
and others come out of the instruction 
buildings, going to them to take off. One 
after another they take off, none knowing 
if he shall come back alive, become a 
prisoner, or die. All are taking chances 
for our country and we should be proud of 
them. They're up in the sky 36,000 feet, 
going to bomb the dictators out of their 
wits. These gallant men are fighting for 
liberty or death. So buy WAR BONDS!!! 

Anonymous. 



A PICKPOCKET'S BAD MISTAKE 

Joe Pocket, a pickpocket, was strolling- 
down the spacious street in a carefree way. 
He was wanted by the police, but he had 
never been caught. He had heard that a new 
police commissioner had been elected but 
he -was not worrying. His favorite spot was 
in front of a building where people gath- 
ered. On the top floor of the expensive 
building, there was an artist drawing. Pall- 
ing in with the crowd, Joe viewed a short 
fat man. Then he struck out with nimble 
fingers, took the man's pocketbook, and 
moved on. 

Then something exciting happened. The 
next day the papers blazed, "Police Com- 
missioner Robbed." Joe murmured to him- 
self, "I wonder who the sap is that robbed 
him." He read farther on, "Newly-elected 
commissioner robbed by pickpocket." Then 
he nervously wiped his perspiring brow. He 
didn't dare go on the streets for a week. 
Finally, he decided to risk taking a stroll. 

A policeman approached and did Joe get 
a surprise! 

"All right, Mr. Joe Pocket, you're under 
arrest for robbing- the new commissioner," 
he said. 

Do you know how the police proved and 
solved the case? Here's how. The artist on 
the top floor was painting the scene below, 
when Joe walked up to the commissioner. 
STANLEY KIREYCZYK '47 



42 PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 

Informal Snapshots 

The snapshots on the following page 
Bring back memories of us at an early age ; 
The age of "readin" and "writin" and "rithmetic", 
Taught to the tune of a hickory stick. 

Here are the "queens in calico", 
And many a "bashful barefoot beau", 
Who've survived the "pencils and the books", 
And the "teachers' cross-eyed looks". 



1. 


Albert Vachula 


2. 


Vera Mielesko 


3. 


Edward Malinowski 


4. 


Clara Toczydlowski 


5. 


Mary Majeski 


6. 


Irene Zelewicz 


7. 


Helen Serowick 


8. 


Verna Skorupski 


9. 


Edward Zima 


10. 


Henry Betsold 


11. 


Edith Filipek 


12. 


Sophie Pinkowski 


13. 


Prize Speaking Contestants 


14. 


Charles Drake 


15. 


Edward Paszek 



44 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 




&*4 



V s . S 



^«W^ p 



^ 



A <V 



\ 










j\ \J of r&yhs 




Vanitie Beauty Shoppe 

191% Main Street Northampton 

Tel. 2524-J 

All Branches of Beauty Culture 

at Reasonable Prices 

SALLY DAHMKE, Prop. 

Mary Filipeck & Marguerite Boyle 



Compliments of 



David Boot Shop 



NORTHAMPTON 



Athletic Supplies 
T. A. Purse^love Co. 

15 STATE ST. 
NORTHAMPTON 



A Real Good Place to Eat 

BECKMANN'S 

Northampton 



LaFleur Bros. 



The Paint People 



45 KING ST. 



NORTHAMPTON 



Tel. 374-M 



E. L. Sheen 



an 



24 Pleasant Street 
Northampton 



AWNINGS 

FURNITURE UPHOLSTERING 

Harness Shop, Automobile Tops 

Glass and Body Work 

Chilson s Shops 

Tel. 1822 
34 Center St. Northampton 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 



.:.—.o_„_„_„_, 1 _u— >„«-.„-«„_„«_„— .,._„_o_„« 


-«—"—"— "—" — —- i.-.— .■.■o».— ^ 


Compliments of 


BEST OF LUCK TO THE 




CLASS OF '44 j 


j Rotert O'Dea 


Pizzitola Music Studios i 


Agent for 


HOLYOKE SPRINGFIELD 


| Boston Mutual Insurance Co. 


NORTHAMPTON j 


Compliments of 




B^ras^, Jeep, Squash 


Compliments of 




Wolrram s General Store 1 




COMPLIMENTS OF 






North Hatfield 


Moose & Muller 




EAT and ENJOY 




! MANHAN'S 


Compliments of 


| Potato Chips — Cheese Corn 


Trie Fair Store j 


and Norma Lee Candies 




MANHAN POTATO CHIPS CO., 


27 Pleasant Street 


I INC. 


Northampton 


Tel. 722 92 King St. Northampton 




j C. F. Roberts 






Compliments of | 


NATIVE POULTRY AND 




j EGGS 


E. S. Dickinson j 


Telephone 2591 Chestnut Street 





Porter-McLeod Machine Tool Co., Inc. 



Hatfield, Mass. 



Pierce s Paint Store 


Merritt Clark & Co. 


196 Main Street Northampton 


SPORT CLOTHES 




Priced Right for the Young Man 


PAINT — WALLPAPER 


Who Graduates 


AND GLASS 


NORTHAMPTON 


Compliments of 


Harlow & Fennesse^ 


Bod s Soda Snoppe 


SCHOOL SUPPLIES 




OF ALL KINDS 



We Extend to the Class of 1944 of Smith Academy 

OUR CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 

FOR A SUCCESSFUL FUTURE 



HOWARD & WOODWARD 



INSURANCE 



14 Elm Street 



Hatfield 



Hatfield Market 


Bradstreet Care 

Mr. S. Kacinski, Prop. 


Meats — Provisions 


BEER — WINES 


Tel. 3911 M. Klocko, Prop. 


Bradstreet Telephone 2331 


Terr^ s 


Compliments of 


Sportsman 


E. J. Gare & Son 


Care 


Main Street Northampton 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER — 1944 



HOFFMAN STUDIO 



52 CENTER STREET 



NORTHAMPTON 





Compliments of | 


Toczko Package Store 


FitzQerala s 


Telephone 2031 


Barber Snop 




NORTHAMPTON 


HATFIELD 






C. Papageorge, Prop. 




Compliments of 


Moriart^ Brotners 


Robert Brooks 


FURNITURE 


Manager 


NORTHAMPTON 


FIRST NATIONAL STORES 




55 Main Street Hatfield j 


Compliments of 




BOARD OF 


SELECTMEN | 




HATFIELD, MASS. 


Hill Brotners 


W. E. Londer^an 


AMERICAN WOOLEN and 




CHATHAM BLANKETS 


PRINTING 


"As You Like It" Hosiery- 


Tel. 1740 I 


Reliable Merchandise 


30 Crafts Avenue Northampton ) 


Reasonable Prices 






CONN. RIVER STOCK FARM — Home of Peter Song 2:00 



Imperial Bakery 

Sloszek Bros. 
BREAD and PASTRY 

Pleasant Street Northampton 

Tke E. & J. Cigar Co. 

WHOLESALE 
TOBACCONISTS 



23 Main Street 



Northampton 



'KNOWLEDGE IS POWER' 

And four-fifths of your knowledge is 
acquired, visually. The sentence, 
therefore, might just as correctly 
read, "Vision is power." 
If your vision isn't normal it means 
that all your information is acquired, 
all your work accomplished, and all 
your recreation enjoyed in the face 
of a serious handicap. 

O. T. DEWHURST 

Optometrists — Opticians 



RILEY'S 



Dairy and Poultry Feeds Mixed 
Fresh Daily 



Telephone 2103 



North Hatfield 





Compliments of 






A. J. BLYDA I 






Hadley, Mass. 






Compliments of 




t^SS) ^ss^iSfi JssJlfe _ ^%\ 

<85S> FLOWERS 


The Bee Hive Store 

SHOES AND FURNISHINGS j 
29 Main St. Northampton 




McCallum s 


DRESS WELL AND SUCCEED 
Stylish Wearing Apparel for the 




Northampton's Largest 


Young Man From Head to Foot 




Department Store 


THRIFTLY PRICED! 




PHONE 1310 


Harq? Daniel Associates 

Northampton 



Northampton Commercial College 
John C. Pickett, Principal 

' ' The School of Thoroughness ' ' 

OUTSTANDING RECORDS ARE THE RESULT OF 
OUTSTANDING INSTRUCTION 

Graduates of Smith Academy have contributed generously to our reputation 
and in so doing have brought credit upon themselves and their Alma Mater. 



Ruh^ s Furniture Store 

5 

Lionel L. Foucher, Mgr. 

Telephone 3519 15 Bridge Street 

NORTHAMPTON 

CLIFFORD'S 

CANDY — SODA 

Hood's Old Fashioned 

ICE CREAM 

Next to Calvin Theater 

Locksmith 

KEYS OF ALL KINDS 
LUGGAGE REPAIRING 

HARLOTS 



24 Center Street 



Northampton 



National Shoe Repairing 

John Mateja, Prop. 

FINEST WORKMANSHIP 
BEST QUALITY MATERIALS USED 

Our Prices Are Always the Lowest 

Masonic Street Northampton 



Compliments of 



Shea & Fortsch 



CONGRATULATIONS AND LOTS 
OF LUCK 

TO THE CLASS OF '44 

Jack August 

Northampton 

"Eat Fish and Keep Fit" 



J. W. PARSONS & SON 



SEEDS 



Phone 2885 



FARM EQUIPMENT 



SPRAY MATERIAL 



P. 0. Box 152 



GRAINS 



75 North King St. 



Compliments of The 

B. & B. Restaurant 

Manager Paul Stefancik 



PROSPECT ST. 



HATFIELD 



Frank Conn Shoe Shop 

Quality Shoe & Rubber Footwear 
at the Lowest Prices 

Shoes for All Occasions 

46 Main St. Over Blanc-Levin 

Up one flight and save money 



Compliments of 

Dail? 
Hampshire Gazette 



Wehster Box Company 

West Hatfield, Mass. 
PHONE 2311 

Charles Eherlein 

PLUMBING — HEATING 

CRANE'S PRODUCTS 

For Beauty and Sanitation 
Elm Street Telephone 3654 

Compliments of 

United Dair^, Inc. 

NORTHAMPTON 



Best Wishes to the Class of 1944 

GEORGE H. HOWARD 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

Agent for the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company 
62 MAIN STREET HATFIELD 



TWIN 


Raymond A. Labbee 


CLEANING, DYEING 


The Pines 


AND STORAGE 


A Complete Service Institution 


CABINS LUNCHES j 




SERVICE STATION 


PHONE 1911-1912 




211 North St. Northampton 


Telephone Northampton 292 


The L^nch Shop 


PERFORMING A DUAL ROLE j 


Jf FOR YOU and VICTORY ^ 


145 Main Street 
Northampton 


L. G- Balrour Co. 

ATTLEBORO, MASS. 


See Us For 


Class Rings and Pins 


HATS 


Commencement Invitations 


FUR COATS 


Diplomas — Personal Cards 


DRESSES 

SPORTSWEAR 


IFOR LLOYD, Representative j 
P. 0. Box 1 Great Barrington j 


Florin s Dru^ Store 


Foster - Farrar Co. 


Prescription Specialists 


HARDWARE 


JAMES P. FLYNN 


SEEDS HOUSEWARES 


LOUIS P. RUDER 




Registered Pharmacists 


162 Main St. Northampton 

!